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David Thompson

Below is a bio of photographer David Thompson, Cornerstone’s artist of the month for June 2019.

David Thompson display

Photography has been a passion of mine for nearly 40 years and began when I first stepped into my high school darkroom. I was fascinated by the process of exposing a piece of photographic paper, slipping it into a tray of developer, and watching an image appear. It wasn’t long before I had purchased my first SLR and 5 rolls of Kodachrome 64.

As with many young photographers, I initially found myself trying to duplicate iconic images of imposing landscapes, stunning sunsets, flowers, and cityscapes cloaked in fog. Capturing these images on film in the “pre-digital” era was considerably more challenging than it is today with digital sensors, image stabilizers, and built-in autofocus. Despite years of trying to perfect “the big picture”, I accepted the fact that I just wasn’t very good at it and instead, became more intrigued with pieces of landscapes, unique perspectives, and capturing what many photographers often overlook.

In recent years my focus has shifted to urban and street photography. Photographing urban landscapes and capturing everyday life in the faces of people going about their daily routines created a result that was static reminder of an ever-changing world. The uniqueness of each image is what I find most appealing.

Leica photographers such as Henry Cartier Bresson, Diane Arbus, André Kertész, Vivian Maier, Thurston Hopkins, Rui Palha, and the singer, Lenny Kravitz, continue to provide a never ending source of inspiration…though my images pale in comparison.

I hope you enjoy viewing these images as much as I enjoyed capturing them.

David Thompson lives in Camp Hill with his wife Rose Eskin and children Julia and Jack…and dogs Katy, Maisey and Milo. All images were taken on a Leica M240.

~

John McNulty

John McNulty grew up in the steel town of North Braddock outside Pittsburgh. From age ten he attended Saturday drawing and painting classes at the Carnegie Museum. With a BS in Graphic Design from La Roche College, and an MBA from Lebanon Valley College, John served as art director and illustrator for several advertising agencies, and in print production for Giant Food Stores.

As a member of Central Pennsylvania’s painting group The Seven Lively Artists, he has exhibited at the State Museum of Pennsylvania, the Cape Cod Museum of Art, and many galleries in the region.

John has enjoyed teaching oil painting classes in Lower Paxton Township and Hershey, and Digital Illustration at Messiah College. His original poster illustrations for Open Stage of Harrisburg have been part of the local arts scene for three decades. His own painting finds inspiration in the landscape and the human figure.

Experienced in several media, John accepts painting and illustration commissions, and shows his own paintings at the Millworks studios in Harrisburg.

John McNulty display

Here is a profile of artist John McNulty, Cornerstone’s artist of the month for May 2019.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

Ever since my early childhood I have been fascinated with color and visual phenomena. Like many artists, I have been drawing my whole life, but it wasn’t until high school that I realized that art was something I could dedicate my life to. For college I attended tyler school of art, and I will receive my BFA in painting this spring. I had never touched oil paint until 3 years ago and found it extremely frustrating at first, but very quickly I fell in love with the possibilities of the material. I am still learning every day, but the more paintings I make the more I feel in control of and find freedom with in the medium.

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

Mixing specific color has been my most recent challenge to overcome, but the process of mixing paint has become a meditative one for me. It is the time when I can really settle into thinking about the painting I plan to make. It takes a lot of thought and attention to detail, but the specificity of color is very important in my work so I love this part of the process.

Recently I have been focused on the color green and how can I make a green painting that feels the way green functions in a landscape. I also think alot about the quality of light and how to paint aspects of the natural world in a way that feels familiar to the viewer.

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

I am constantly seeking inspiration from other contemporary artists, it would be difficult to par down into a small list. However the one artist who has been the most influential to the way I am thinking about painting now, is Vincent Van Gogh. Everyone loves Van Gogh and rightfully so, but about a year ago I got to visit his museum in Amsterdam, and the experience gave me great insight into him as an artist, as well as inspiring me to mix more specific color and to develop my own language as a painter.

Do you have a favorite piece in your portfolio?

My favorite piece I have created is titled “Light Rising” it is a fairly large diptych, informed by the abstraction of the landscape reflected in creek water. the painting is a very abstract field of brush marks in various greens, browns, blues and colors which reference light. The process of making this painting was very physical and allowed me to work loosely and quickly and I think that this kind of energy, coupled with very specific color, resulted in a painting which has a profound spiritual and enlightened energy.

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

It is difficult to give advice to other young oil painters, because I feel as though I have just started using the medium myself. However, one thing I have learned is that every painting made was worthwhile. All of the ugly, bad paintings I have made have taught me something and it is most important to always be working and setting goals for yourself in order to learn and improve your craft.

~

Linda Williard

Here is a profile of artist Linda Williard, Cornerstone’s artist of the month for April 2019.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

I have always done art, from childhood on. My first introduction to oil paint was in high school.

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

Currently I like oil for it dense consistency. Creating texture, painting thickly, allows me to create a painting that is sculpted in oil..

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

Most recently Phyllis Disher Fredericks, has influenced my color pallet and introduced e to sculpting with oil paint

Linda Buckwalter display

Do you have a favorite piece in your portfolio?

Earth’s Canaries, since it was created only with complementary colors of yellow and purple. The most recent is often my favorite one.

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

Paint, paint, paint. Practice a great deal.

~

Alyssa Marie Brown

Here is a profile of artist Alyssa Marie Brown, Cornerstone’s artist of the month for March 2019.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

Ever since my early childhood I have been fascinated with color and visual phenomena. Like many artists, I have been drawing my whole life, but it wasn’t until high school that I realized that art was something I could dedicate my life to. For college I attended Tyler School of Art, and I will receive my BFA in painting this spring. I had never touched oil paint until 3 years ago and found it extremely frustrating at first, but very quickly I fell in love with the possibilities of the material. I am still learning every day, but the more paintings I make the more I feel in control of and find freedom with in the medium.

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

Mixing specific color has been my most recent challenge to overcome, but the process of mixing paint has become a meditative one for me. It is the time when I can really settle into thinking about the painting I plan to make. It takes a lot of thought and attention to detail, but the specificity of color is very important in my work so I love this part of the process.

Recently I have been focused on the color green and how can I make a green painting that feels the way green functions in a landscape. I also think a lot about the quality of light and how to paint aspects of the natural world in a way that feels familiar to the viewer.

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

I am constantly seeking inspiration from other contemporary artists, it would be difficult to par down into a small list. However the one artist who has been the most influential to the way I am thinking about painting now, is Vincent Van Gogh. Everyone loves Van Gogh and rightfully so, but about a year ago I got to visit his museum in Amsterdam, and the experience gave me great insight into him as an artist, as well as inspiring me to mix more specific color and to develop my own language as a painter.

Do you have a favorite piece in your portfolio?

My favorite piece I have created is titled “Light Rising” it is a fairly large diptych, informed by the abstraction of the landscape reflected in creek water. the painting is a very abstract field of brush marks in various greens, browns, blues and colors which reference light. The process of making this painting was very physical and allowed me to work loosely and quickly and I think that this kind of energy, coupled with very specific color, resulted in a painting which has a profound spiritual and enlightened energy.

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

It is difficult to give advice to other young oil painters, because I feel as though I have just started using the medium myself. However, one thing I have learned is that every painting made was worthwhile. All of the ugly, bad paintings I have made have taught me something and it is most important to always be working and setting goals for yourself in order to learn and improve your craft.

~

Carisa Kozicki

Here is a profile of photographer Carisa Kozicki, Cornerstone’s artist of the month for February 2019.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

My love affair with photography began at an early age. When I was only 9, after watching my Pap Pap document our family for years, I saved my money and asked him to take me to buy my very own camera. The camera cost me $39. the sales associate gave me some free black and white film which transformed my life. For many years, I developed and printed my own film and black and white photographic prints in my basement darkroom. Although I am strictly a digital photographer now, I stick true to my roots and offer photography that is considered lifestyle, realistic, quirky, fun, and emotionally driven.

I studied photography in high school and college and graduated from Millersville University with an English and art degree. I continue my photographic and business knowledge by attending workshops and taking online courses and seminars.

My love for animals also began at an early age. I began a pet sitting business after college; and I found myself always bringing my camera with me to photograph my clients. in 2005, I officially began my professional photographic career and started my own company offering lifestyle family sessions, graduating senior sessions, weddings, business branding images, commercial images, and of course, one of my favorite session types, pet photography!

I have also had the pleasure of donating my time to photograph many homeless animals to help promote their adoptions in pursuit of finding them furever homes!

Dog and Bridesmaids

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

I’m a visual storyteller. I look forward to documenting relationships. Visual images are powerful! They evoke emotions and memories and tell stories of times and of people. Some we know or knew: some we never had the chance to know.

One of the very special sessions I offer I named Celebration Sessions. These are for senior pets (10 years or older) or those that may be terminally ill. These are sessions meant to celebrate the bond and relationship with your special animal companion. When we invite an animal into our lives and into our homes they become valued family members.

As a professional photographer and storyteller, part of my job includes creating and offering my clients professionally crafted and finished products. I don’t want you to have to do any work after the session is over; this is my job and part of the experience you receive with CarisaK Photography. It’s my belief that photographs are better when shared. Let’s get them off of the USB drives, off of the phones, and off of the computers. Let’s get them back on your walls, back on your coffee tables, and back in family albums so they can become a permanent part, an heirloom if you will, of your family’s history. I firmly believe print media is not dead, just revitalized! You will likely never have the time you think to go back through thousands of images from years past on your hard drives and cloud systems to view your family, vacation, and loved one’s images. You will look at that album on your coffee table though, and so might your children and your grandchildren!

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

My grandfather, Pap pap, was one of my earliest inspirations. Every year, during the holidays, we would all gather in his living room and he would set up his old projector. We would relive the previous years’ worth of birthdays, holidays, dance recitals, field hockey games, and interesting hairstyles. He taught me that there is value and beauty in every day moments.

I also loved Ansel Adam’s black and white landscape images

My heart dog, Olive, was a huge inspiration and my muse for both the pet sitting business and ultimately the pet aspect of my photographic career.

My clients inspire me! Everyone’s story is different!

Do you have a favorite piece in your portfolio?

My favorite pieces change all of the time. 😉

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

It’s a heavily saturated industry, but if photography is your passion, you should follow it. Hone your craft, learn how to work your camera, find and use light in a way that gets you excited. Photograph subjects that inspire you. If you decide to offer your services professionally, learn a lot about business and pricing before doing so. Appreciate the importance of marketing, and learn how to run a profitable business which is different than a charitable business. Value your industry, time, and talent. Follow your passion, and keep learning through successes and misses.

~

CarisaK Photography website

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