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John McNulty

Cornerstone’s Artist of the Month for October

John McNultyHere is a recent Q&A with John McNulty.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

I’ve loved drawing as long as I can remember.

I grew up in the Monongahela Valley steel town of North Braddock, near Pittsburgh. In my working-class town, there were no artists or galleries and no art mentors to speak of. But my older brothers gave me my first rudimentary drawing instruction.

When I was ten, a teacher suggested the free “Tam O’Shanter” art class offered by the Carnegie Museum. So I gave up watching Saturday morning cartoons to ride the bus into Pittsburgh, sit for hours with hundreds of other kids, sketch in the museum’s collections, and learn about art. The motto of the class was “Look, to see, to remember,” good advice for any artist. The drawing class led to a high school painting class, and I’ve been painting ever since.

In an attempt to use my love of art to make a living, I studied Graphic Design at La Roche College in Pittsburgh, and worked as an advertising art director, illustrator and production artist. My most rec was fifteen years in the advertising department of Giant Food Stores, now Ahold Delhaize, in Carlisle. I continued to paint on my own time, and began teaching painting.

While taking classes at the Art Association of Harrisburg, I met some members of the Seven Lively Artists, and was invited to paint with them. I’ve been painting and showing with the group for twenty years.

Currently, I keep gallery space at the Millworks in Harrisburg, accept painting commissions, do freelance illustration, and paint interior murals. I teach Digital Illustration at Messiah College and oil painting at the Hershey Art Association.

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

As a kid, I began sketching in pencil, and I still love it. Learning to use color has become a lifelong challenge, but a labor of love.

I paint in both oils and acrylics. Both are adaptable to different techniques, which allows me to try new things. I like the quick-drying quality of acrylics. On the other hand, I like the easy blending and subtle neutrals attainable with oils. Lately, I’ve been applying my paint in layers, adding textural interest and making the paint itself more evident. All artwork is a dialog between the artist and the medium. I like to let the medium make itself known.

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

I find inspiration in the relationship of colors and shapes in nature and in everyday scenes we often take for granted. I have a particular fondness for painting trees. To me, trees are metaphors for human life and longing. Like us, they stand upright, their roots searching for a stable foothold, their branches surviving hard times while stretching out to grow. A tree’s scarred trunk and twisting branches can exemplify the determination and striving of life itself.

I have a continuously growing pantheon of artists who inspire me. When I was just starting out, my two favorites were Michelangelo and Van Gogh, as different as they are. Then there was Monet and the Impressionists. Of course, John Singer Sargent. I’ve also loved N.C. Wyeth, Maxfield Parrish, and others from the golden age of American illustration. I’ve grown to love the abstract expressionism of the late Li Hidley.

All artwork has lessons to teach. After painting most of my life, composition has become more important to me than realistic rendering.

Do You Have a Favorite Piece in Your Portfolio?

No.

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

Be bold. Start with a big brush. Use lots of paint! Paint doesn’t earn interest the longer you keep it. Remember the composition. Don’t try to squeeze all your artistic ideas into one painting. Do another. Keep painting.

~

 

Kathleen Lubold

Cornerstone’s Artist of the Month for September

Kathleen Luboldr display
Below is a recent Q&A with Wendy Palmer.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

Growing up I loved to draw and to be creative. I was happiest with a pencil in one hand and a piece of paper in the other. After graduating high school, I attended HACC for a period of time studying in the Fine Arts curriculum. But, as life moved on so did my interests and I eventually stopped attending. During my time at HACC I had two photography classes. Although I enjoyed the classes and learned a great deal, I had no thoughts of being a photographer or even using a camera on a regular basis. Little did I know, many years later I would pick up a digital camera and not be able to put it down.

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

With digital photography, I like the instant gratification of being able to see your pictures as soon as you take them. I like that you can take as many pictures as you want/need and with computer software/applications you can be even more creative with your photographs.

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

Son, mother, husband and God, they not only inspired me but are the ones I attribute and thank for helping me find a passion I never knew I had.

First, my son, Nicholas, who at a very young age loved to use my camera to take picture after picture of his toys, our goldfish, and our cats. Although I thought his pictures were beautiful works of art and I enjoyed envisioning him one day being a wildlife photographer, it became very expensive developing roll after roll of film, only to find that most of the pictures were of his toys, our goldfish, and our cats. Because of Nicholas’ love of taking pictures, I purchased my first digital camera.

Second, my mother, Jean, for it was her garden, her flowers that captivated me. She has always been an avid gardener. I never understood why she loved it so much until I took those first few pictures of her yellow tulips and pink roses. I was amazed at their beauty and that though the use of my camera, I was able to capture that beauty. I continue to be inspired by their beauty.

Third, my husband, Paul, for he was the one that gave me my Canon Rebel XSi and the house we live in with the tree outside the kitchen window where the birds come and gather. I have spent hours standing at that kitchen window taking picture after picture of those little birds or just waiting for one to come along. The joy he has given me with his gift has not stopped since the day he gave it to me and I am so grateful to him for that.

And fourth, I give praise and glory, honor and thanks to God above. He is always with us, always working behind the scenes on our behalf, leading us towards our purpose, for his purpose, for his glory! As I look back, I can see how God brought everything together for me. Everything I described above with my son and my old camera, my mother and her flowers and with God bringing my husband into my life; that was all God’s doing! “Everything comes from God alone. Everything lives by His power and everything is for His glory.” Romans 11:36 .

Do You Have a Favorite Piece in Your Portfolio?

The pictures of the cardinals, they are my favorite.
cardinal

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

Always keep your camera close by and use it every day.

~

 

Wendy Palmer

Cornerstone’s Artist of the Month for August 2017

Below is a recent Q&A with Wendy Palmer.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

A resident of the Harrisburg area for the past 30 years, photographer Wendy Palmer is a native of Cape Town, South Africa. Here she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in physiotherapy, and a Medical Honors degree in sport science from the University of Cape Town.

In the United States, after the birth of their second son, Wendy completed an Associate Degree in photography at the Harrisburg Area Community College while continuing to work as a physical therapist.

Today she primarily focuses on photography. This is her passion!

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

Photography is a means of telling a story with an image/images. It is about being able to evoke an emotional response to one’s images, and about sharing one’s passion! To be out in nature, capturing the magical first and last light and incredible vistas, is what drives me to keep exploring and sharing. In my work with people it is being able to find their essence and to capture meaningful moments. These can sometime be difficult moments as experienced while working on a project with a woman who underwent bilateral mastectomies. Together she and I have created a traveling exhibit of our work: my images and her poetry, which depicts her journey. The intention being to raise awareness and bring hope to others.

More information about our project is available on the website: Edges-of-Light.org

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

My first landscape photography workshop in 2002 through Santa Fe Workshops, “Seeing the Light” with world-renowned photographer, Jack Dykinga, was the awakening of my passion for landscape photograph, and the desire to keep searching for the light. There is magic that happens when one hikes in the dark and then watches as the sun rays transform the landscape in a golden glow.

I continue to be inspired by top notch photographers. My most recent workshop through the Pacific Northwest Art School was with Sam Abell on Whidbey Island. He has a clean direct way of looking at things and completely shook up the way I approach a photo shoot. Each of the workshops gives one a new slant and way of looking and approaching one’s work. Santa Fe Workshops, Maine Media and the Pacific Northwest Art School all run workshops for small groups and are ideal for learning. It’s also the connection with other students that fosters discussion and sharing.

Looking at other photographer’s work is also invaluable. Photographers that immediately come to mind are Henri Cartier Bresson for capturing the candid photographical “decisive moment”, Edward Weston for his mastery of form and figure, and Elliot Erwitt for capturing candid absurd situations, to name but a few.

Do You Have a Favorite Piece in Your Portfolio?

It was so hard to make this decision, but I would probably say it’s this one from Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley National Park.
Death Valley

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

Read and learn. Never stop being curious and keep challenging yourself. Photography is a process and it keeps evolving. Don’t be shy to talk to other photographers. Know your equipment. Ask for critiques. Shoot often.

~

 

Maximilian Romanauskas

Romanauskas display

Cornerstone’s Artist of the Month for June 2017

Maximilian is a watercolor artist and student in his junior year of high school. When he is not cramming for an exam, he can be found drawing or painting. He is more commonly known as “Death
by Reindeer”.

Below is a recent Q&A with Maximilian Romanauskas.

Tell us briefly about your background & how you got started in your medium.

I ALWAYS HAD A STRANGE FEAR OF PAINTING. IT WAS UNCONTROLLABLE, MESSY AND VERY FAR OUT OF MY COMFORT ZONE. THAT WAS UNTIL I WAS CLEANING OUT MY OLD ART SUPPLIES AND STUMBLED UPON AN OLD WATERCOLOR SET. FOR WHATEVER REASON I WAS INCAPABLE OF THROWING IT OUT. IT SAT ON MY DESK FOR WEEKS, HAUNTING ME. EVENTUALLY I COULDN’T TAKE IT ANYMORE AND SAT DOWN AND PAINTED. I COULDN’T STOP PAINTING AFTER THAT AND WATERCOLOR BECAME MY GO-TO MEDIUM.

How does your medium inform your viewpoint? Or what do you like most about your medium?

COMPARED TO OTHER WAYS OF PAINTING SUCH AS ACRYLIC, OIL OR GOUACHE, WATERCOLOR HAS A UNIQUELY SOFT LOOK. THE COLOR IS OFTEN QUITE THICK AND SATURATED NO MATTER WHAT SHADE WITH OTHER PAINTING MEDIUMS. WATERCOLOR, ON THE OTHER HAND, IS TRANSPARENT AND HAS A MUCH MORE NATURAL FEELING. I SUITS MY STYLE MUCH BETTER THAN MOST MEDIUMS COULD.

Who or what have been your artistic inspirations?

WHEN I INITIALLY HAD DEDICATED MORE OF MY TIME TO ART I HAD FOUND INSPIRATION FROM ANIME AND MANGA. OVERTIME I FOUND MYSELF PUSHING FOR A MORE REALISTIC STYLE AND LOST MOST OF THE OBVIOUS JAPANESE STYLE. NOW MY ART IS MORE INSPIRED BY INDIE ARTISTS AND COMICS.

Do You Have a Favorite Piece in Your Portfolio?

I BELIEVE PARENTS SHOULD NEVER PICK FAVORITES, BUT IF I HAD TO PICK ONE FROM MY FULL PORTFOLIO IT PROBABLY WOULD BE “REAL BOY”, WHICH IS THE PAINTING OF A VERY UNFORTUNATE PINOCCHIO. HONESTLY IT TOOK SO LONG TO MAKE THAT IF IT WASN’T MY FAVORITE I’D BE A LITTLE UPSET.

What would be your advice to artists just starting out in your medium?

MY ADVICE TO ARTISTS STARTING OUT IN WATERCOLOR WOULD BE TO JUST START PAINTING. IF YOU WANT TO PAINT THEN YOU SHOULDN’T GET CAUGHT UP IN ALL THE REASONS YOU “CAN’T”. THE MORE YOU PAINT, THE BETTER YOU WILL GET, BUT YOU HAVE START PAINTING.

~

 

Tapas and Tastings

Tapas and Tastings banner

Cornerstone is excited to announce a brand new style of event on Friday, July 7th. This event will be held on our front deck and will feature a combination of our homemade grilled catering creations with local beers from the 2050 State Brew Co, an up and coming brewery led by Brewmaster Brad Moyer. In total there will be 5 courses of tapas paired with 5 different beers and plenty of fun!

Mike Bates, our head baker and catering coordinator is the creator of the menu which will feature:

  • Bacon Wrapped Dates with Bourbon Glaze
  • Marinated Manchego & Citrus Crostini
  • Roasted Squash & Boursin Flatbread Pizza
  • Mexican Grilled Corn & Chorizo Stuffed Chile Relleno
  • Sweet & Savory Baked Donut with Rosemary, Honey, Matcha, Sea Salt baked in duck fat. Served a la mode.

This is event is for ages 21 and over and the cost is $50 per person. Call us at (717) 737-5026 to reserve today as space is limited for this relaxing evening where people can sample our catering menu and some local bee.

Stay tuned for more events with local breweries in the future!

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